Industrialised Service Delivery Redux II

22 Sep

In my previous post I discussed the way in which our increasingly sophisticated use of the Web is creating an unstoppable wave of change in the global business environment.  This resulting acceleration of change and expectation will require unprecedented organisational speed and adaptability whilst simultaneously driving globalisation and consumerisation of business.  I discussed my belief that companies will be forced to reform as a portfolio of systematically designed components with clear outcomes and how this kind of thinking changes the relationship between a business capability and its IT support.  In particular I discussed the need to create industrialised Service Delivery Platforms which vastly increase the speed, reliability and cost effectiveness of delivering service realisations. 

In this post I’ll to move into the second part of the story where I’ll look more specifically at how we can realise the industrialisation of service delivery through the creation of an SDP.

Industrialisation 101

There has been a great deal written about industrialisation over the last few years and most of this literature has focused on IT infrastructure (i.e. hardware) where components and techniques are more commoditised.  As an example many of my Japanese colleagues have spent decades working with leaders in the automotive industry and experienced firsthand the techniques and processes used in zero defect manufacturing and the application of lean principles. Sharing this same mindset around reliabliity, zero defect and technology commoditisation they created a process for delivering reliable and guaranteed outcomes through pre-integration and testing of combinations of hardware and software.  This kind of infrastructure industrialisation enables much higher success rates whilst simultaneously reducing the costs and lead times of implementation. 

In order to explore this a little further and to set some context, let’s Just think for a moment about the way in which IT has traditionally served its business customers.  

nonindutsrialisedvsindustrialised

We can see that generally speaking we are set a problem to solve and we then take a list of products selected by the customer – or often by one of our architects applying personal preference – and we try to integrate them together on the customers site, at the customers risk and at the customers expense. The problem is that we may never have used this particular combination of hardware, operating systems and middleware before – a problem that worsens exponentially as we increase the complexity of the solution, by the way – and so there are often glitches in their integration, it’s unclear how to manage them and there can’t be any guarantees about how they will perform when the whole thing is finally working. As a result projects take longer than they should – because much has to be learned from scratch every time – they cost a lot more than they should – because there are longer lead times to get things integrated, to get them working and then to get them into management – and, most damningly, they are often unreliable as there can be no guarantees that the combination will continue to work and there is learning needed to understand how to keep them up and running.

The idea of infrastructure industrialisation, however, helps us to concentrate on the technical capability required – do you want a Java application server? Well here it is, pre-integrated on known combinations of hardware and software and with manageability built in but – most importantly – tested to destruction with reference applications so that we can place some guarantees around the way this combination will perform in production.  As an example, 60% of the time taken within Fujitsu’s industrialisation process is in testing.  The whole idea of industrialisation is to transfer the risk to the provider – whether an internal IT department or an external provider – so that we are able to produce consistent results with standardised form and function, leading to quicker, more cost effective and reliable solutions for our customers.

Now such industrialisation has slowly been been maturing over the last few years but – as I stated at the beginning – has largely concentrated on infrastructure templating – hardware, operating systems and middleware combined and ready to receive applications.  Recent advances in virtualisation are also accelerating the commoditisation and industrialisation of IT infrastructure by making this templating process easier and more flexible than ever before.  Such industrialisation provides us with more reliable technology but does not address the ways in which we can realise higher level business value more rapidly and reliably.  The next (and more complex) challenge, therefore, is to take these same principles and apply them to the broader area of business service realisation and delivery.  The question is how we can do this?

Industrialisation From Top to Bottom

Well the first thing to do is understand how you are going to get from your expression of intent – i.e. the capability definitions I discussed in my previous post that abstract us away from implementation concerns – through to a running set of services that realise this capability on an industrialised Service Delivery Platform. This is a critical concern since If you don’t understand your end to end process then you can’t industrialise it through templating, transformation and automation.

endtoendservicerealisation

In this context we can look at our capability definitions and map concepts in the business architecture model down to classifications in the service model.  Capabilities map to concrete services, macro processes map to orchestrations, people tasks map to workflows, top level metrics become SLAs to be managed etc. The service model essentially bridges the gap between the expression of intent described by the target business architecture and the physical reality of assets needed to execute within the technology environment.

From here we broadly need to understand how each of our service types will be realised in the physical environment – so for instance we need a physical host to receive and execute each type of service, we need to understand how SLAs are provisioned so that we can monitor them etc. etc.

Basically the concern at this stage is to understand the end to end process through which we will transform the data that we capture at each stage of the process into ever more concrete terms – all the way from logical expressions of intent through greater information about the messages, service levels and type of implementation required, through to a whole set of assets that are physically deployed and executing on the physical service platform, thus realising the intent.

The core aim of this process must be to maximise both standardisation of approach and automation at each stage to ensure repeatability and reliability of outcome – essentially our aim in this process is to give business capability owners much greater reliability and rapidity of outcome as they look to realise business value.  We essentially want to give guarantees that we can not only realise functionality rapidly but also that these realisations will execute reliably and at low cost.  In addition we must also ensure that the linkage between each level of abstraction remains in place so that information about running physical services can be used to judge the performance of the capability that they realise, maximising the levers of change available to the organisation by putting them in control of the facts and allowing them to ‘know sooner’ what is actually happening.

Having an end to end view of this process essentially creates the rough outline of the production line that needs to be created to realise value – it gives us a feel for the overall requirements.  Unfortunately, however, that’s the nice bit, the kind of bit that I like to do. Whilst we need to understand broadly how we envisage an end to end capability realisation process working, the real work is in the nasty bit – when it comes to industrialisation work has to start at the bottom.

Industrialisation from Bottom to Top

If you imagine the creation of a production line for any kind of physical good they obviously have to be designed to optimise the creation of the end product. Every little conveyer belt or twisty robot arm has to be calibrated to nudge or weld the item in exactly the same spot to achieve repeatability of outcome. In the same way any attempt to industrialise the process of capability realisation has to start at the bottom with a consideration of the environment within which the final physical assets will execute and of how to create assets optimised for this environment as efficiently as possible. I use a simple ‘industrialisation pyramid’ to visualise this concept, since increasingly specialised and high value automation and industrialisation needs to be built on broader and more generic industrialised foundations. In reality the process is actually highly iterative as you need to continually be recalibrating both up and down the hierarchy to ensure that the process is both efficient and realises the expressed intent but for the sake of simplicity you can assume that we just build this up from the bottom.

industrialisationpyramid

So let’s start at the bottom with the core infrastructure technologies – what are the physical hosts that are required to support service execution? What physical assets will services need to create in order to execute on top of them? How does each host combine together to provide the necessary broad infrastructure and what quality of service guarantees can we put around each kind of host? Slightly more broadly, how will we manage each of the infrastructure assets? This stage requires a broad range of activity not just to standardise and templatise the hosts themselves but also to aggregate them into a platform and to create all of the information standards and process that deployed services will need to conform to so that we can find, provision, run and manage them successfully.

Moving up the pyramid we can now start to think in more conceptual terms about the reference architecture that we want to impose – the service classifications we want to use, the patterns and practices we want to impose on the realisation of each type, and more specifically the development practices.  Importantly we need to be clear about how these service classifications map seamlessly onto the infrastructure hosting templates and lower level management standards to ensure that our patterns and practices are optimised – its only in this way that we can guarantee outcomes by streamlining the realisation and asset creation process. Gradually through this definition activity we begin to build up a metamodel of the types of assets that need to be created as we move from the conceptual to the physical and the links and transformations between them. This is absolutely key as it enables us to move to the next level – which I call automating the “means of production”.

This level becomes the production line that pushes us reliably and repeatably from capability definition through to physical realisation. The metamodel we built up in the previous tier helps us to define domain specific languages that simplify the process of generating the final output, allowing the capture of data about each asset and the background generation of code that conforms to our preferred classification structure, architectural patterns and development practices. These DSLs can then be pulled together into “factories” specialised to the realisation of each type of asset, with each DSL representing a different viewpoint for the particular capability in hand.  Individual factories can then be aggregated into a ‘capability realisation factory’ that drives the end to end process.  As I stated in my previous post the whole factory and DSL space is mildly controversial at the moment with Microsoft advocating explicit DSL and factory technologies and others continuing to work towards MDA or flexible open source alternatives.  It is suffice to say in this context that the approaches I’m advocating are possible via either model – a subject I might return to actually with some examples of each (for an excellent consideration of this whole area consult Martin Fowler’s great coverage, btw).

The final level of this pyramid is to actually start taking the capability realisation factories and tailoring them for the creation of industry specific offerings – perhaps a whole set of ‘factories’ around banking, retail or travel capabilities. From my perspective this is the furthest out and may actually not come to pass; despite Jack Greenfield’s compelling arguments I feel that the rise of SOA and SaaS will obviate the need to generate the same application many times by allowing the composing of solutions from shared utilities.  I feel that the idea of an application or service specific factory assumes a continuation of IT oversupply through many deployments; as a result I feel that the key issue at stake in the industrialisation arena is actually that of democratising access to the means of capability production by giving people the tools to create new value rapidly and reliably.  As a result I feel that improving the reliability and repeatability of capability realisation across the board is more critical than a focus on any particular industry. (This may change in future with demand, however, and one potential area of interest is industry specific composition factories rather than industry specific application generation factories). 

Delivering Industrialised Services

So we come at last to a picture that demonstrates how the various components of our approach come together from a high level process perspective.

servicefactoryprocess

Across the top we have our service factory. We start on the left hand side with capability modelling, capturing the metadata that describes the capability and what it is meant to do. In this context we can use a domain specific language that allows us to model capabilities explicitly within the tooling. Our aim is then to use the metadata captured about a capability to realise it as one or more services. In this context information from the metamodel is transformed into an initial version of the service before we use a service domain language to add further detail about contracts, messages and service levels. It is important to note that at this point, however, the service is still abstract – we have not bound it to any particular realisation strategy. Once we have designed the service in the abstract we can then choose an implementation strategy – example classifications could be interaction services for Uis, workflow services for people tasks, process services for service orchestrations, domain services for services that manage and manipulate data and integration services that allow adaptation and integration with legacy or external systems.

Once we have chosen a realisation strategy all of the metadata captured about the service is used to generate a partially populated realisation of the chosen type – in this context we anticipate having a factory for each kind of service that will control the patterns and practices used and provide guidance in context to the developer.

Once we have designed our services we now want to be able to design a virtual deployment environment for them based wholly on industrialised infrastructure templates. In this view we can configure and soft test the resources required to run our services before generating provisioning information that can be used to create the virtual environment needed to host the services.

In the service platform the provisioning information can be used to create a number of hosting engines, deploy the services into them, provision the infrastructure to run them and then set up the necessary monitoring before finally publishing them into a catalogue. The Service Platform therefore consists of a number of specialised infrastructure hosts supporting runtime execution, along with runtime services that provide – for example – provisioning and eventing support.

The final component of the platform is what I call a ‘service wrap’. This is an implementation of the ITSM disciplines tailored for our environment. In this context you will find the catalogue, service management, reporting and metering capabilities that are needed to manage the services at runtime (this is again a subset to make a point). In this space the service catalogue will bring together service metadata, reports about performance and usage plus subscription and onboarding processes.  Most importantly there is a strong link between the capabilities originally required and the services used to realise them, since both are linked in the catalogue to support business performance management. In this context we can see a feedback loop from the service wrap which enables capability owners to make decisions about effectiveness and rework their capabilities appropriately.

Summary

In this second post of three I have demonstrated how we can use the increasing power of abstraction delivered by service-orientation to drive the industrialisation of capability realisation.  Despite current initiatives broadly targeting the infrastructure space I have discussed my belief that full industrialisation across the infrastructure, applications, service and business domains requires the creation and consistent application of known patterns, processes, infrastructures and skills to increase repeatability and reliability. We might sacrifice some flexibility in technology choice or systems design but increasing commoditisation of technology makes this far less important than cost effectiveness and reliability. It’s particularly important to realise that when industrialising you need to understand your end to end process and then do the nasty bit – bottom up in excruciating detail.

So in the third and final post on this subject I’m going to look a little bit at futures and how the creation of standardised and commoditised service delivery platforms will affect the industry more broadly – essentially as technology becomes about access rather than ownership so we will see the rise of global service delivery platforms that support capability realisation and execution on behalf of many organisations.

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5 Responses to “Industrialised Service Delivery Redux II”

  1. Richard Veryard April 22, 2010 at 10:45 am #

    Hi Ian. Whatever happened to part 3?

    • ian April 22, 2010 at 11:21 am #

      Hi Richard – good to hear from you as I like your writing a lot 🙂 Basically Lloyds TSB happened to part 3 – I left Fujitsu just after this post to work as CTO of Lloyd’s General Insurance business – mostly working on the target architecture for the HBOS integration – and my available blogging time suddenly became nil, lol. Strangely from a timing perspective I have just started working at Fujitsu again – in the software rather than services company this time – and so am going to restart both my blog and my engagement with the community (my reading also atrophied somewhat during this period) 🙂 You’re not the only one to ask me about part 3 and so I’m planning on finishing that – despite the fact that the content’s a bit old – as one of my initial posts; kind of ease myself back in, really.

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