Business Enablement as a Key Cloud Element

30 Apr

After finally posting my last update about ‘Industrialised Service Delivery’ yesterday I have been happily catching up with the intervening output of some of my favourite bloggers.

One post that caught my eye was a reference from Phil Wainwright – whilst he was talking about the VMForce announcement – to a post he had written earlier in the year about Microsoft’s partnership with Intuit.  Essentially one of his central statements was related directly to the series of posts I completed yesterday (so part 1, part 2 and part 3):

“the breadth of infrastructure <required for SaaS> extends beyond the development functionality to embrace the entirely new element of service delivery capabilities. This is a platform’s support for all the components that go with the as-a-service business model, including provisioning, pay-as-you-go pricing and billing, service level monitoring and so on. Conventional software platforms have no conception of these types of capability but they’re absolutely fundamental to delivering cloud services and SaaS applications”.

This is one of the key points that I think is still – inexplicably – lost on many people (particularly people who believe that cloud computing is primarily about providing infrastructure as a service).  In reality the whole world is moving to service models because they are simpler to consume, deliver clearer value for more transparent costs and can be shared across organisations to generate economies of scale.  In fact ‘as a service’ models are increasingly not going to be an IT phenomenon but also going to extend to the way in which businesses deal with each other across organisational boundaries.  For the sale and consumption of such services to work, however, we need to be able to ‘deliver’ them; in this context we need to be able to market them, make them easy to subscribe to, manage billing and service levels transparently for both the supplier and consumer and enable rapid change and development over time to meet the evolving needs of service consumers.  As a result anyone who wants to deliver business capabilities in the future – whether these are applications or business process utilities – will need to be able to ensure that their offering exhibits all of these characteristics. 

Interestingly these ‘business enablement’ functions are pretty generic across all kinds of software and services since they essentially cover account management, subscription, business model definition, rating and billing, security, marketplaces etc etc (i.e. all of the capabilities that I defined as being required in a ‘Service Delivery Platform’).  In this context the use of the term ‘Service Delivery Platform’ in place of cloud or PaaS was deliberate; what next generation infrastructures need to do is enable people to deliver business services as quickly and as robustly as possible, with the platforms themselves also helping to ensure trust by brokering between the interests of consumers and suppliers through transparent billing and service management mechanisms.

This belief in service delivery is one of the reasons I believe that the notion of ‘private clouds’ is an oxymoron – I found this hoary subject raised again on a Joe McKendrick post after a discussion on ebizQ – even without the central point about the obvious loss of economies of scale; essentially  the requirement to provide a whole business enablement fabric to facilitate cross organisational service ecosystems – initially for SaaS but increasingly for organisational collaboration and specialisation – is just one of the reasons I believe that ‘Private Clouds’ are really just evolutions of on-premise architecture patterns – with all of the costs and complexity retained – and thus purely marketecture.  When decreasing transaction costs are enabling much greater cross organisational value chains the benefits of a public service delivery platform are immense, enabling organisations to both scale and evolve their operations more easily whilst also providing all of the business support they need to offer and consume business services in extended value chains.  Whilst some people may think that this is a pretty future-oriented reason to not like the notion of private clouds, for completeness I will also say that to me  – in the sense of customer owned infrastructures – they are an anachronism; again this is just an extension of existing models (for good or ill) and nothing to do with ‘cloud’.  It is only the fact that most protagonists of such models are vendors with very low level maturity offerings like packaged infrastructure and/or middleware solutions that makes it viable, since the complexity of delivering true private SDP offerings would be too great (not to mention ridiculously wasteful).  In my view ‘private clouds’ in the sense of end organisation deployment is just building a new internal infrastructure (whether self managed or via a service company) sort of like the one you already already have but with a whole bunch of expensive new hardware and software (so 90% of the expense but only 10% of the benefits). 

To temper this stance I do believe that there is a more subtle, viable version of ‘privacy’ that will be supported by ‘real’ service delivery platforms over time – that of having a logically private area of a public SDP to support an organisational context (so a cohesive collection of branded services, information and partner integrations – or what I’ve always called ‘virtual private platforms’).  This differs greatly from the ‘literally’ private clouds that many organisations are positioning as a mechanism to extend the life of traditional hardware, middleware or managed service offerings – the ability of service delivery platforms to rapidly instantiate ‘virtual’ private platforms will be a core competency and give the appearance and benefits of privacy whilst also maintaining the transformational benefits of leveraging the cloud in the first place.  To me literally ‘private clouds’ on an organisations own infrastructure – with all of their capital expense, complexity of operation, high running costs and ongoing drag on agility – only exist in the minds of software and service companies looking to extend out their traditional businesses for as long as possible. 

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