Cloud is not Virtualization

12 Jan

In the interests of keeping a better record of my online activity I’ve recently decided to cross-post opinions and thoughts I inflict on people via forums and other technology sites via my blog as well (at least where they are related to my subject and have any level of coherence, lol).  In this context I replied to an ebizq question yesterday that asked “Is it better to use virtualization for some business apps than the cloud?“.  This question was essentially prompted by a survey finding that some companies are more likely to use virtualisation technologies than move to the cloud.

Whilst I was only vaguely interested in the facts presented per se, I often find that talking about cloud and virtualisation together begs people to draw a false equivalence between two things that – at least in my mind – are entirely different in their impact and importance.

Virtualisation is a technology that can (possibly)  increase efficiency in your existing data centre and which might be leveraged by some cloud providers as well.  That’s nice and it can reduce the costs of hosting all your old cack in the short term. Cloud on the other hand is a disruptive shift in the value proposition of IT and the start of a prolonged disruption in the nature and purpose of businesses.

In essence cloud will enable organisations to share multi-tenant business capabilities over the network in order to specialise on their core value. Whilst virtualisation can help you improve your legacy mess (or make it worse if done badly) it does nothing significant to help you take advantage of the larger disruption as it just reduces the costs of hosting applications that are going to increasingly be unfit for purpose due to their architecture rather than their infrastructure.

In this context I guess it’s up to people to decide what’s best to do with their legacy apps – it may indeed make sense in the short term to move them onto virtualised platforms for efficiency’s sake (should it cost out) in order to clean up their mess during the transition stage.

In the longer term, however, people are going to have to codify their business architecture, make decisions about their core purpose and then build new cloud services for key capabilities whilst integrating 3rd party cloud services for non-differentiating capabilities. In this scenario you need to throw away your legacy and develop cloud native and multi-tenant services on higher level PaaS platforms to survive – in which case VMs have no place as a unit of value and the single tenant legacy applications deployed within them will cease to be necessary. In that context the discussion becomes a strategic one – how aggressively will you adopt cloud platforms, what does this mean for the life span of your applications and how will it impact the case for building a virtualised infrastructure (I was assuming it was a question of internal virtualisation rather than IaaS due to the nature of the original question). If it doesn’t pay back or you’re left with fairly stable applications already covered by existing kit then don’t do it.

Either way – don’t build new systems using old architectures and think that running it in a virtualised environment ‘future proofs’ you; the future is addressing a set of higher level architectural issues related to delivering flexible, multi-tenant and mass customisable business capabilities to partners in specialised value webs. Such architectural issues will increasingly be addressed by higher level platform offerings that industrialise and consumerise IT to reduce the issues of managing the complex list of components required to deliver business systems (also mentioned as an increasing issue in the survey).   As a result your route to safety doesn’t lie in simply using less physical – but equally dumb – infrastructure.

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2 Responses to “Cloud is not Virtualization”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Why Amazon dedicated instances is no big deal… and why it really is « IT Blagger 3.0 - March 29, 2011

    […] IT service vendors start from the perspective of trying to protect existing models by merely adding virtualisation and management to existing estates.  They are trying to extend an old model of enterprise IT in the vague […]

  2. The Business Case for Private Cloud « IT Blagger 3.0 - April 20, 2011

    […] etc etc and deliver them as an apparently simple service.  I’ll say it again – cloud is not just some virtualisation software.  I don’t know why but I just don’t seem able to say that enough.  For some reason people […]

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